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These torso stretches are ideal to do while practicing because you don’t have to take off your guitar. For best results, your feet should be shoulder width apart and you should be balanced firmly on your pelvis with knees slightly bent. Always remember these 4 things:

Relax in a comfortable position.
Stretch slowly in a NO PAIN range of motion.
Stretch as needed or at least every 1 – 1.5 hours.
Remember to stretch both sides!

Torso Stretch 1

This first stretch can be started using the last stretch from our hand stretch series.

photo5

This time, with fingers interlaced, raise your hands slowly in front of your body until they are directly above your head. Stretch upwards and hold 10-15 seconds.

photo6

Then, in the same position being sure to keep hands directly over head, bend slowly to one side and hold for 10-15 seconds. Then bend slowly to the other side, keeping your spine straight and hold for equal amount of time.

photo7

Torso Twist

Place your hands in a comfortable position resting on your guitar. If you’re playing an electric, you can place your hands at your hips or in prayer position.

photo13

Twist your torso slowly to one side. Allow your head to move into the twist as well. Once again, don’t force it. As you twist, look as far to that side as you can just by moving your eyes. This makes the twist more energizing. Hold the twist for 10 to 15 seconds, breathing deeply and fully into the lower abdomen and lower back. When you’re finished, repeat the twist in the other direction.

photo2

Neck Rolls

Begin with shoulder blades back and down. Keeping your shoulders in this position, lower your chin gently to your chest and hold here for a few seconds.

photo-4

Now bring your left ear to your left shoulder, dropping your right shoulder for maximum stretch and hold.

photo12

Gently raise your chin towards the ceiling, being careful not to let the head fall back without control.

chin

Now bring right ear to right shoulder wile dropping left shoulder and hold.

photo-3

Finally come back to chin to chest. Remember to breathe slowly and repeat 3 – 5 times.

Torso Stretch 2

Begin with fingers interlaced behind your back as in picture below

photo4

Lift arms to stretch upper arms and back. Hold as long as comfortable.

photo1

Bending over slightly, raise arms even higher to give your lower back a nice stretch. Again, hold as long as comfortable

photo3

We hope these stretches will help you keep your body happy during your practice sessions. Treat it as a magnificent and irreplaceable instrument that deserves your TLC. And don’t forget to hydrate!

Whether you play a stringed instrument for a living and spend long hours practicing or whether you work in front of a computer all day and play on weekends or for your own pleasure, it’s important to remember that your hands and bodies are precious instruments as well and should be given the same TLC.

Before you start to play, and perhaps every 30 minutes or so, give your hands a break by doing some of the following warm up exercises. Be sure to repeat each exercise with both hands. And take the opportunity to do some deep conscious breathing as well.

Begin by simply loosening your wrists and shaking your hands to get the blood flowing.

Open your hand wide, making space between each finger very slowly, then hold it for 10 seconds.

photo

Close your hand into a gentle fist and hold that for 10 seconds.

photo-1

Do that several times, and as often as you think of it throughout the day. It’s a convenient stretch that can be done anywhere, any time.

Now, holding your hand out in front of you with elbow locked, very gently and slowly bend each finger back and hold for a few seconds. Remember your thumb as well.

photo-2

After stretching all the fingers individually, then hold all four fingers back together for 10 seconds. This loosens stiff fingers, hands and wrists and, completed daily for a few months, hands will become more flexible.

photo-3

Next, still keeping the elbow locked, grasp hand and slowly bend wrist down until a stretch is felt. Hold for 10 seconds.

photo-4

Now, turning the hand over and continuing to keep elbow straight, grasp hand and slowly flex wrist until stretch is felt and hold for 10 seconds.
Repeat all of the exercises above on your other hand.

photo-5

If you need to do a quick stretch between songs, interlace your fingers, exhale, and push your hands out to shoulder level turning your palms away from you. This quickly stretches the wrist and finger muscles and increases circulation to the area.

photo-6

Here’s hoping you will incorporate these simple exercises into your practice or at your desk. Your hands will thank you for it! Stay tuned for torso exercises to keep you loose and limber during practice or at the office.

2005
As a brand new company, we were so down to the wire at our first Jan 2005 NAMM show that some prototypes were actually being shipped to the hotel! Our first catalogue did not take shape until 2006.

2006
In 2006 Luna was still a female-centric instrument line. The 2006 cover featured a hennaed hand playing a Henna guitar and inside pages were lush with layers and textures. It was also filled with inspiring quotes on each page. The front cover urged the reader to:
“Take down a musical instrument…let the beauty you love be what you do.” Rumi
The back cover encouraged players to:
“Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine.” Siddhartha
This year was the birth of our “Fantasie” series featuring classic Pre-Raphaelite artwork as well as our Andromeda electrics.

2006 cover

2006 inside Fantasie

2006 inside Andromeda

2006 back cover

view the entire 2006 catalogue here.

2007

2007 continued the tradition set in our first catalogue by offering an even richer palate with a vintage leather book cover featuring a classic piece of art entitled “Passion” by Frank Dicksee (1853-1928). We took the liberty of adding our Henna guitar as well as Henna ornamentation on the sensuous dancing girl’s hands and feet. Each page of the catalogue also offered inspirational sayings and began another tradition by offering a message from Luna’s muse, Yvonne de Villiers.

Yvonne’s letter for 2007

My grandmother’s name was Luz which means light, from the Latin “lucere”…to shine. Music became a big part of my life as I watched my mother Hilda, an incandescent spirit, blaze her way through her career as an electric bass player in a male oriented field. My own professional path involved 30 years as a professional stained glass artist “sculpting” light. It seems almost as though I was fated, and it’s certainly a high honor, to be filling the role of artistic designer and creative director for Luna Guitars. …elegant instruments with musical integrity crafted to inspire players of all ages and walks of life to let their own unique lights shine.

Our 2007 catalogue is dedicated to the radiance within us all. It has no edges. It permeates and shines through everything. Everywhere. Always. In the end, we are all light.

Luna Guitars’ name sake is the moon that shines by reflecting the constant light of the sun. Like the moon, we wax and wane. Sometimes we feel bright and clear and sometimes we find ourselves in darkness. But the source of light is always there. I encourage you to remember that always…especially in dark or challenging times.

So, enjoy our offerings, enjoy the inspiration and remember to let your light shine!

2007 catalogue front

2007 Letter

2007 Flora & Fauna

2007 inside2

2007 back

view the entire 2007 catalogue here

2008

During 2007, we received may letters from males who were attracted to Luna instruments but were, understandably, hesitant to purchase instruments that they believed to be crafted for females. It was never Luna’s intention to exclude males, but rather to help females feel more included in the music industry. In 2008 we broadened our design efforts so that Luna would be perceived as a more gender neutral rather than gender specific company. The cover, which continued the vintage book look, reflected this new direction. Inspirational quotes became a mainstay of Luna catalogues that have continued into the present.

Yvonne’s letter for 2008:

As those of you who are familiar with Luna’s story know, I was inspired to start Luna Guitars with the aim of bringing balance to the marketplace by providing quality instruments for females … guitars that were ergonomically friendly as well as visually striking. Luna instruments were embraced by both female and male players because of the innovative ornamentation and the comfort factor. Beyond that, the company has received many letters from owners speaking to the authenticity and substance of Luna’s designs that engage players on a deeper level. As a result of this heartfelt feedback from players, Luna has entered a new phase.

Our revised mission statement puts it all together: “At Luna Guitars, our mission is designing inspired quality instruments that are physically comfortable, aesthetically engaging and spiritually nourishing.”
With more people than ever making music on this planet, and because music is our world’s universal language … Luna is pleased to speak to players’ hearts by making instruments that touch the body, the mind and the spirit.

2008 front

2008 muse

2008 apollo

2008 back

view the enire 2008 catalogue here

2009 & 2010

Unfortunately, Luna did not have catalogues in 2009 & 2010, but rather foldable posters with small images of all of our instruments. The  images below show the front of the posters when folded.

2009

2010

2011

By 2011, our growing Luna family of players was developing a sense of tribe.
We decided to use pictures of everyday players on the front and back of our catalogue to honor and celebrate the loyal grassroots advocates that we owe our success to. This catalogue was a departure from our previous catalogues as it had a much cleaner background and was animated by lifestyle shots featuring every day Luna players.

Yvonne’s letter for 2011:

For this year’s cover, we chose to feature some of the many players who have sent us their pictures: players so various they may seem connected by a love of music and nothing else. Don’t be fooled. We’ve learned over the last 8 years that the extraordinary Luna tribe is made up of individuals only disguised as ordinary people.

In reality we are free thinkers confident enough to follow our hearts and instincts; artists who derive meaning from visual symbols that, like music, speak a universal language; intuitive women, men, children who know that small things actually are the big things; musicians who want our instruments to reflect our individuality; citizens of the world who believe we can make a difference and are involved in advancing the greater good in our own back yards; local anthropologists who honor and celebrate both our own culture and the cultures of others; human beings who value authenticity, who challenge the status quo.

Here we like to think that the Luna tribe has been drawn together by instruments that merge form and function, that engage the senses and fire the imagination. if you’re already a Luna player, we send our sincere thanks for putting your faith in us. if you are not, we hope you will consider joining the Luna tribe!

front 2011

inside1

inside3

inside5

back 2011

view the entire 2011 catalogue here

2012

By 2012, our Luna tribe had grown by leaps and bounds. The 2012 catalogue posed question….how will YOU make your mark in this world, drawing it’s inspiration from an actual photograph of an Argentinian cave painting. We continued our use of lifestyle photos….this time in elegant black and white. We also added feature pages that allowed the detail work on our instruments to be better appreciated.

Yvonne’s letter for 2012.

Our hands play and make, comfort and caress. Our hands make music for us, make artists of us. Our hands communicate age, gender, ethnicity, occupation, and hint at our characters and histories. Our hands are powerful ~ transforming unseen energy into the world of form. Indeed, the word manifestation grows out of the Latin root manus ~ or hand.

The hands of our Luna Tribe are diverse and strong. And there are countless and unique ways that we express this power through music. Music is entertaining. Music is recreational. Music is therapeutic. Music is educational. In all of its incarnations…Music is good medicine!

The handprints on the front and back cover are from a cave in Patagonia, Argentina. The mysterious hand prints were made some 9,000 years ago using bone pipes to spray color on the wall around each hand. Humans in these caves literally made their mark.

How will you make yours?

We can’t all be celebrities. What can each of us do with our music that will resonate and radiate? We can teach a child to play. We can play for our loved ones. Play for our place of worship. Play for a hospital. Play for a school, a nursing home, a hospice, a homeless shelter, a psychiatric facility, a prison. We can organize or perform for a non-profit benefit event. We can donate unused instruments so life can be breathed into them again. We can play for our own inner peace. What ever it is, only you can do it. It doesn’t have to be a huge thing….

Naomi Shihab Nye put it beautifully:

I want to be famous in the way a pulley is
famous, or a buttonhole, not because it did
anything spectacular, but because it never
forgot what it could do.

Luna invites you, you out there reading these words, to remember what only you can do to make your mark through music.

Welcome to the tribe!

2012 cover

2012 henna ls

2012 Henna feature

2012 Muse lifestyle

2012 back

view the entire 2012 catalogue here

2013

In 2013 we continued our trajectory of using everyday players throughout out catalogue spreads.
Some photos were sent in by players and others were taken spontaneously on the streets of our hometown. In fact, the model playing our six string uke in his cubicle was the designer for our catalogue!

Yvonne’s letter for 2013

American poet Mary Oliver ends her poem, Summer Day, with these lines:

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” …

More likely we ask ourselves, if money were no object, what would I do with
the rest of my life? However you answer these questions, I would urge you
to listen to yourself! Begin now, and pursue your answer with all your heart.
If your answer is music, or any art form, you may struggle with another
question: “am I good enough to call myself an artist?” Let me counter.
“Does this calling make me come alive?” If the answer is yes, your art will be
worthy – and joyous.

If keeping your day job is a necessity, then spend your laboring hours
remembering why you work, and what it is you labor for. Remembering
what sets your soul on fire. Art is work, too, so you know in your bones how
work can be made into art. No matter what you do, put your heart, mind
and soul into the smallest details of it. The flow from your work to your
art – and back again – may surprise you. All your days and your nights may
become a kind of fiery play. And the results of your effort may change much
and many around you.

Be daring. Be impractical. Be bold. Do the thing that excites and compels
you, the thing that scares you. Fuel the practice of your craft with
authenticity and openness. Manifest the music you were born to play, the
canvases you were meant to paint, the pages you were destined to write.
Your one precious life is yours alone. Pay attention to your fire, to your
ache, to your most courageous heart.

Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?

2013 cover

2013Bernie

2013 safari

2013 Vintage

2013 Chris

2013 back

view the entire 2013 catalogue here

2014

During 2013 we held a contest that encouraged players to create Pinterest boards in the spirit of Luna. We were overwhelmed by the enthusiastic response and learned a lot from the resulting boards. Some common motifs in both words and images were “freedom”, “bohemian”, “family”, “uniqueness” , “diversity”. So to reflect this vision back to our “Tribe” we envisioned a front and back cover comprised of a diverse group of musicians making music together around a vintage VW van. We had so much fun with the shoot that we kicked off 2014 with a corresponding contest with airfare to Florida for 2, 5 days in a fully stocked VW van and 2 Luna ukuleles to play along the way!

Yvonne’s letter for 2014

“Sacred space and sacred time and something joyous to do is all we need. Almost anything then becomes a continuous and increasing joy” – Joseph Campbell

Because you are reading this catalogue, the “something joyous to do” in
the equation above is probably music. Most of us have day jobs. That’s a
fact. Here at Luna, there are many amazing musicians working 9:00-6:00…
a reality that a large number of us cannot escape. So, we must create the
other two factors in the equation – sacred time and sacred space – with
conscious intent.

Sacred space can take many forms. It can be as small as a conscious breath,
as large as the universe… and anything in between. My own sacred space,
created for my qigong/tai chi and meditation practice, exists in what used
to be my stained glass studio of 20 years.
The process of creating it was an unforgettable experience, because
friends came together and we used what I already had… what was given to
me, what I loved, what inspired me, and what made me feel passionate -
and therefore more alive. It was about making a part of myself visible.
Take a look around and see how you can use the physical area you have to
create sacred space for your own explorations. If you can devote a room,
fill it with not only what is necessary for musical functionality, but also with
visuals, scents and textures that feed your soul. If it’s only the corner of a
room, treat it the same.

Sacred time is the last element. Whatever time you are able to devote,
make sure it is conscious and consistent. If that means hanging a sign on
the doorknob that says “deep play in progress”, then do so. And make sure
your near and dear ones understand what this means to you.
Uninterrupted flow is necessary for any creative endeavor. I encourage you,
for 2014, to find a way to keep this process alive. For creative souls, it is not a
selfish luxury; it is a necessity… as necessary as the air that we breathe.

I wish you continuous and increasing joy.

lunacollection2014_120813_frontandback copy

2014 front

2014 inside

2014 inside2

2014 inside 3

2014 inside4

2014 back

view the entire 2014 catalogue here

artdeco
The Great Gatsby is going gangbusters in the theaters, its lush Art Deco setting having a great influence on current fashion and design.

Art Deco was an influential design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s and flourished internationally during the 30′s and early 40′s. It is an eclectic style influenced by machine age imagery and materials. One of Deco’s major attributes is an embrace of technology which distinguishes it from the organic motifs favored by its predecessor Art Nouveau. The style is often characterized by rich colors, bold geometric shapes, and lavish ornamentation.

The fingerboard and rosette ornamentation on Luna’s all solid Art Deco guitar was inspired by Deco’s strong geometry.
artdeco neck

During its heyday Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress. It was a time of energy and excitement. Folks were willing to make bold, new statements with their art, wardrobe, home decor, architecture and automobiles.

ARCHITECTURE

These were the buildings of the future: sleek, geometric, dramatic. With their cubic forms and zigzag designs, art deco buildings embraced the machine age. Yet many features of the style were drawn from ancient history. The very shape of these buildings expresses a fascination for orderly forms and primitive architecture. The early Art Deco skyscrapers suggest Egyptian or Assyrian pyramids with terraced steps rising to the top.

Perhaps the most famous example is New York’s Chrysler Building designed by William Van Alen. Briefly the world’s tallest building, the skyscraper is adorned with eagle hood ornaments, hubcaps and abstract images of cars. Other Art Deco architects used stylized flowers, sunbursts, birds and machine gears.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building detail

Chrysler Building detail

Chrysler Building Detail

Chrysler Building Detail

355 Burraud - Vancouver

355 Burraud – Vancouver

Paris Art Deco

Paris Art Deco

Mauretania 1934

Mauretania 1934

classic South Beach

classic South Beach

INTERIORS

cast iron entrance Domus on Madison NYC

cast iron entrance Domus on Madison NYC

Lobby Empire State Building

Lobby Empire State Building

metal work Chanin Building NYC

metal work Chanin Building NYC

Ventillation grille - Goelet Building NYC

Ventillation grille – Goelet Building NYC

AUTOMOBILES

A radical era in automobile design that spawned sleek, streamlined cars with unique aeronautical names.

Delahaye 175

Delahaye 175

1937 Delahaye Type 135

1937 Delahaye Type 135

The 1939 Graham "Spirit of Motion."

The 1939 Graham “Spirit of Motion.”

1925 Rolls Royce Phantom I Jonckheere Aerodynamic Coupe

1925 Rolls Royce Phantom I Jonckheere Aerodynamic Coupe

Deco Cadillac

Deco Cadillac

Blasolene Decoliner

Blasolene Decoliner

Not a car but a Henderson Motorcycle

Not a car but a Henderson Motorcycle

EVERYDAY OBJECTS

Deco pen

Deco pen

1930's perfume bottle

1930′s perfume bottle

Auguste Bonaz 1925

Auguste Bonaz 1925

Royal Doulton Art Deco TANGO tea set

Royal Doulton Art Deco TANGO tea set

Art Deco Paul Schreckengost Tea Pot, 1938.

Art Deco Paul Schreckengost Tea Pot, 1938.

Deco letter box

Deco letter box

FASHION
Defined by the women’s liberation movement, a prosperous economy, and key improvements in technology, all of which led to the development of a whole new way of life – a life of progressive modernity, luxury and leisure.

Greta Garbo 1920's

Greta Garbo 1920′s

Bebe Daniels

Bebe Daniels

Mariane Morehouse in Chanel for Vogue

Mariane Morehouse in Chanel for Vogue

Vogue 1928

Vogue 1928

circa 1920

circa 1920

1920's ~The Costume Heritage Museum ~ Madrid

1920′s ~The Costume Heritage Museum ~ Madrid

JEWELRY

Tiffany - Art Deco lady’s wristwatch

Tiffany – Art Deco lady’s wristwatch

Art Deco coral, diamond and emerald ear pendents by Cartier

Art Deco coral, diamond and emerald ear pendents by Cartier

Early Art Deco briolette cut aquamarine and diamond pendant, French 1920

Early Art Deco briolette cut aquamarine and diamond pendant, French 1920

Art Deco Pendant Chromium plated brass Glass French, c.1930.

Art Deco Pendant Chromium plated brass Glass French, c.1930.

French Art Deco necklace with sapphire and diamonds, c1930

French Art Deco necklace with sapphire and diamonds, c1930

Luna's Craftsman Guitar

Luna’s Craftsman Guitar

The Craftsman style is an architectural, interior design, landscape design, applied arts, and decorative arts style and lifestyle philosophy that began in the last years of the 19th century. As a comprehensive design and art movement it remained popular into the 1930s. However, in decorative arts and architectural design it has continued with numerous revivals and restoration projects through present times.

The American Craftsman style has its origins from the British Arts and Crafts movement which began as a philosophy and artistic style founded by William Morris earlier in the 1860s. The British movement was a reaction to the industrial revolution, with its disregard for the individual worker and degradation of the dignity of human labor. Seeking to ennoble the craftsman once again, the movement emphasized the hand-made over the mass-produced.

The British movement was a response to the Victorian, but the Arts and Crafts style’s arrival in the United States was precisely at the moment when theVictorian era was coming to a close. The American Arts and Crafts Movement also encouraged originality, simplicity of form, local natural materials, and the visibility of handicraft. It was distinguished by being concerned with ennobling the modest homes of the rapidly expanding American middle class, which became the Craftsman Bungalow style.

Dard Hunter

Dard Hunter was an American Arts and Crafts designer whose designs for books, leather, glass and metal helped unify the Roycroft product line and distinguish it from that of other American Arts & Crafts enterprises. His highly recognizable Rose motif was the inspiration for Luna’s Arts and Crafts guitar.
Detail

Roycroft Magazine

Roycroft Magazine

Dard Hunter Book Cover

Dard Hunter Book Cover

Dard Hunter Stained Glass Design

Dard Hunter Stained Glass Design

Dard Hunter Tiles

Dard Hunter Tiles

Architecture

The “Prairie School” of Frank Lloyd Wright and other architects in Chicago, the bungalow and ultimate bungalow style of houses popularized by Greene and Greene are some examples of the American Arts and Crafts and American Craftsman style of architecture.

Stickley's Log Home

Stickley’s Log Home

Duncan Irwin

Duncan Irwin

Gamble House 1

Gamble House 1

Gamble House 2

Gamble House 2

Advertisement for small Bungalow

Advertisement for small Bungalow

Small "middle-class" Bungalow

Small “middle-class” Bungalow

Interior Design

The Arts and Crafts style initiated a variety of attempts to reinterpret European Arts and Crafts ideals for Americans. These included the Craftsman-style furniture, and other decorative arts such as designs promoted by Gustav Stickley in his magazine, The Craftsman. Furniture and decorative arts were meant to be not only beautiful but functional, in harmony with nature, timeless and built with integrity.

Craftsman Interior Drawing 1

Craftsman Interior Drawing 1

Craftsman Interior Design Drawing 2

Craftsman Interior Drawing 2

Craftsman Interior Drawing 3

Craftsman Interior Drawing 3

Gamble House Interior 1

Gamble House Interior 1

Gamble House Interior 2

Gamble House Interior 2

Gamble House Stair Detail

Gamble House Stair Detail

Gilliand House 1

Gilliand House 1

Gilliand House 2

Gilliand House 2

Greene & Greene Duncan-Irwin House

Greene & Greene Duncan-Irwin House

Greene & Greene Thoorsen House

Greene & Greene Thoorsen House

Greene & Greene

Greene & Greene

Gustaf Stickley Home

Gustaf Stickley Home

Gustaf Stickley Home 2

Gustaf Stickley Home 2

Applied Arts

Ginko Leaf Tile

Ginko Leaf Tile

Acanthus Leaf Wallpaper

Acanthus Leaf Wallpaper

Celtic Knot Wallpaper

Celtic Knot Wallpaper

William Morris Trellis Wallpaper

William Morris Trellis Wallpaper

Stickley Highlans Park Carpet

Stickley Highlans Park Carpet

Decorative Arts

Craftsman Pottery

Craftsman Pottery

Craftsman Lamp

Craftsman Lamp

Stickley framed tile

Stickley framed tile

Stickley Copper Work

Stickley Copper Work

Edward Burnes Pamona Tapestry

Edward Burnes Pamona Tapestry

William Morris Birds Tapestry

William Morris Birds Tapestry

Glass

Stickley Style Glass

Stickley Style Glass

Greene & Greene Glass

Greene & Greene Glass

artnouveau

Luna’s Art Nouveau guitar was inspired by the Art Nouveau movement. This is, admittedly, a long post but there were so many facets of life influenced by Art Nouveau that I hope to do justice to its scope.

Art Nouveau was a artistic movement which peaked in popularity between 1890 and 1910 which was practiced in the fields of art, architecture and applied art. It is a French term meaning “new art” and is characterized by organic and plant motifs as well as other highly stylized forms. The organic forms often took the form of sudden violent curves which were often referenced by the term “whiplash”. You can see organic motifs at the rosette and 12th fret of  the instrument as well as a “whiplash” curve at the rosette.

artnouveaucrop
Art Nouveau’s success was a reaction against  late 19th century academic art and was replaced by the development of 20th century modernist styles. Art Nouveau was most popular in Europe, but its influence was global and influenced many different mediums:

ARCHITECTURE
Architects tried to harmonize with the natural environment.
1. door

2. brussels 6 rue de lac

3.AN door

4. AN door1

5. Art Nouveau Scrollwork - Helsinki

6. Beaubourg:Les Halles - Paris

7. Brussels 1900

8. Brussels Belgium

9. France Immeuble Biet 1901

10. German AN in Konstanz by Arnim Schulz

11. Pharmacy France

12. architecture Antwerp

INTERIORS
Art Nouveau is also considered a philosophy of design of furniture and other elements of interior design. The focus was design keeping the entire building in mind and making all details part of ordinary life.

1. AN furniture

2. AN vanity

3. chair

4. desk

5. fchair

6. door details

7. Horta house

7.A_ StairsHortaHouseBXL_

8. Art Nouveau Style House Villa Liberty near Moscow, Russia 1

9. Art Nouveau Style House Villa Liberty near Moscow, Russia 2

10.doorway

11. interiorc

12. Henry van de Veld

GLASS
Glass art was a medium in which the style found tremendous expression—for example, the works of Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, Charles Rennis Mackintosh in Glasgow, and Emile Galle and Rene Lalique in France.

1. AN vase

2. art nouveau vase

3. Loetz art Nouveau vase w: Juventa pewter mount

4. Zsolnay Art Nouveau vase 1900

emile galle

emile galle

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique perfume bottle

lalique perfume bottle

tiffanny chandelier

tiffanny chandelier

tiffany dragonfly lamp

tiffany dragonfly lamp

tiffany wisteria lamp

tiffany wisteria lamp

tiffany window

tiffany window

17. Brussels

18. Paris

JEWELRY
Jewelry of the Art Nouveau period revitalized the jeweler’s art, with nature as the principal source of inspiration, complemented by new levels of virtuosity in enameling and the introduction of new materials, such as opals and semi-precious stones. The first image is os a woman adorned in the art nouveau style….a perfect blank canvas for the stunning jewelry and hair combs to follow.

art nouveau fashion

art nouveau fashion

lalique moth pendant

lalique moth pendant

lalique cicada pin

lalique cicada pin

lalique dragonfly necklace

lalique dragonfly necklace

lalique necklace

lalique necklace

lalique pendant

lalique pendant

lalique dragonfly pendant

lalique dragonfly pendant

lalique peacock pendant

lalique peacock pendant

lalique skylark pendant

lalique skylark pendant

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

lalique

POSTERS
The flowery, ornate style was born practically overnight in 1894 when Alphonse Mucha, a Czech artist working in Paris, was pressed to produce a poster for Sarah Bernhardt, the brilliant actress who had taken Paris by storm. His creation was the first masterpiece of Art Nouveau poster design. The poster craze of the 1890s witnessed the spread of poster art to all of Europe and America and with it the Art Nouveau style.

Alfons Mucha

Alfons Mucha

mucha

mucha

mucha

mucha

crescent bicycles

crescent bicycles

mucha

mucha

mucha

mucha

mucha

mucha

adolph hohenste

adolph hohenste

toulouse-lautrec

toulouse-lautrec

toulouse-lautrec

privat livemont

privat livemont

private livemont

private livemont

privat livemont

privat livemont

paul berthon

paul berthon

Songwriting in Character


Tip from Mary Amato: Try Character-Based Songwriting

Mary Amato has multiple personalities. She is an award-winning novelist and songwriter who often takes on the roles of her characters. Her books Guitar Notes http://thrumsociety.com/and The Naked Mole-Rat Letters both feature music and a forthcoming novel will include original songs on uke. In her book Guitar Notes, the main character, Lyla, picks a Luna as her first guitar. Mary plays her Luna Safari on book tours. Here she talks with Luna about her process.

How does writing fiction influence your songwriting?
You have to get “into character” to write fiction. I do it with songwriting, too. It’s liberating to shed your own ego, dive into the soul of another person, and see the world from that point of view.
How do you get started writing a character-based song?
First, imagine a character. This can be someone you have invented, or you could be inspired by a stranger or a person in a photograph or painting. Next, make a choice about whether you’re going to write in “first person” or “third person.” If you pretend you are the person and you are using “I,” then you’re writing in first person. If you’re singing about the character and use “she” or “he,” then you’re writing in third person.

Can you give examples?
Sure. John Prine put himself in a woman’s shoes to write “Angel from Montgomery” which has been covered often. “I am an old woman named after my mother…” That’s a first-person, character-based song. Paul McCartney chose third person to write about the Eleanor Rigby in his classic song. “Eleanor Rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been…”

You can read the full lyrics to both of these songs at the end of this blog.

What tips do you have for songwriters who want to try writing character-based songs?
Try one of these brainstorming ideas and then use the raw material that you come up with to craft your song.
• Write a diary entry as if you are the character.
• Interview yourself as the character. Ask all kinds of questions: What do you love? What are you afraid of? What makes you smile?
• Take a walk, imagining that you are the character and allow yourself to think the thoughts of that character. Jot down all your thoughts when you return.

Let go of any inhibitions you might have and enjoy!

Angel from Montgomery video and lyrics 

I am an old woman named after my mother
My old man is another child that’s grown old
If dreams were lightnin’ and thunder were desire
This old house would’ve burned down a long time ago

Make me an Angel that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing that I can hold onto
To believe in this livin’ is just a hard way to go

When I was a young girl, well, I had me a cowboy
Weren’t much to look at just a free ramblin’ man
But that was a long time and no matter how I try
The years just flow by like a broken down dam

Make me an Angel that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing that I can hold onto
To believe in this livin’ is just a hard way to go

There’s flies in the kitchen, I can hear ‘em in there buzzin’
And I ain’t done nothin’ since I woke up today
How the hell can a person go to work in the mornin’
And come home in the evenin’ and have nothin’ to say?

Make me an Angel that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing that I can hold onto
To believe in this livin’ is just a hard way to go
To believe in this livin’ is just a hard way to go

Eleanor Rigby Lyrics Video

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