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Archive for January, 2012

NAMM – Day 3

The good news…..Luna has had an AMAZING show! The booth has been packed for the past few days and we have gotten some great feedback and lots of orders. The bad news…..we were so busy walking dealers through our new product line that I hardly had time to take any pictures. Here are a few that I managed to snap today.

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Day before the show!

The last post was about gearing up for NAMM….here is a photo narrative of setting up the booth the day before.




















STAY TUNED!!!!!!!!

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Gearing up for NAMM

What is NAMM???
NAMM, or the National Association of Music Merchants, is the largest and longest-running musical instruments and products trade show in the United States held yearly in Anaheim, California.  For those that have never been, it is a hard experience to describe. Last year there were over 90, 000 registered attendees and 1417 exhibitors showcasing anything and everything to do with music. Most of these exhibitors had instruments. Imagine all of them cranking it up to 11 to be heard above the din! OK….now imagine being there for 4 straight 8 hour days in that soup of sonic sound waves. Hopefully this helps you understand why the word “intense” describes the experience. NAMM…”Not A Mellow Moment”

Developing New Instruments
Luna is in low gear for the event all year by developing new products to showcase. Each new Luna instrument involves :
1. Coming up with an innovative idea. Depending on the instrument, this is done by myself (Yvonne) or by our UK artist in residence, Alex Morgan.
2. Sending artwork and specifications halfway across the planet to our partners in Korea and China
3. Exchanging a ka-zillion emails and photos with our overseas partners until we are satisfied we have a winner. Receiving and opening a box with a new prototype inside is like Christmas morning every time! We have had 28 such boxes arrive at Luna headquarters this year! You can read about the inspiration for two of them, the AMM 100 and AMZ 100.

AMZ 100

AMM100

Catalog
Things shift into high gear around October as we start to get our new catalog together. This year was even more challenging than usual but we managed to throw a Hail Mary pass over the printer’s deadline!
Take a peek here!

Compiling Show Instruments
The next quest is stockpiling one of each Luna instrument for the show. This may seem simple, but because we have been so massively back ordered this year it was quite a feat. Especially during the holidays when customers were calling in to say that the only thing their son, daughter, husband, wife, mother, father, etc. had their heart set on for Christmas was a specific Luna, and the only one in the warehouse was on a NAMM pile. Hard to hang tough when the heart strings are being tugged! Every instrument on every pile then has to be set up by our instrument technicians before being placed in crates and trucked from Florida to California.

One of many NAMM piles


California Bound!!!!

Planning for Booth
Our booth is 20′ x 20′, yet every year we have to figure out how to fit more instruments into the same space. This year we made the decision to bring acoustic instruments only. Instruments tags and booth signage are designed. Our staff flies out 2 days ahead of the show start to set up our booth and place instruments. Here are some pics of this year’s signage and last year’s booth.

2012 NAMM signage



2011 Booth first morning before invasion

Incidentals
The main reason that we fly across the country and go through all of the above steps is to foster relationships with our dealers. It’s a chance to meet with them face to face and gauge their first hand response to our products as well as gain their input. We put together gift baskets for our top dealers as a personal thank you. This year we’re giving them a basket that will hopefully soothe their body as well as their spirits. The traditional offering of wine and quality snacks is being augmented by a NAMM SURVIVAL KIT consisting of ear plugs, Airbourne Immune Support, hand sanitizer, mints, herbal throat lozenges, aspirin and a nice bottle of sea salt bath soak!

Preparing the Gift Baskets


And Finally
Packing!!!!!!! Please stay tuned for updates from this year’s NAMM show.

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AMZ 100
In expanding our Americana Series, we looked to Southwest Pueblo Native cultures. The AMZ 100 has taken its inspiration from the pottery of the Zia pueblo of New Mexico, recognized for their superb achievements in pottery making.

 

Famous for their large storage jars and huge dough bowls, Zia pottery is distinct from its neighboring pueblos because it is made with clay that fires to a rich red tone and comes in a variety of styles including polychrome on a white slip and polychrome on a orange slip. The sunburst finish of the AMZ 100 seeks to replicate the coloring of this pottery.

The maple fret markers of the AMZ 100 set against an ebony fret board depict a rising or setting sun based on the Zia rayed Sun symbol which has four arms – each of which has four parts. ‘Four’ is an auspicious or sacred number for the Zia: the four points of the compass, the four periods of each day, four seasons of the year, four stages of life, and the four sacred obligations for one’s physical, mental, spiritual and social health.

The Zia also believe that in the great brotherhood of all things, man has four sacred obligations: he must develop a strong body, a clear mind, a pure spirit, and a devotion to the welfare of his people. Both the Zia Pueblo flag and the New Mexico State Flag feature the Zia sun symbol.

The sound hole of the AMZ 100 was inspired by a common wave motif found on Zia water jars. Water jars or “Ollas” are defined as “… relatively large vessels used for collecting, carrying and storing water”.


Following are several pieces of pre 1900 Zia pottery that show just a few of the great number of traditional motifs utilized in this stunning historical art form.








After 1900, most Zia potters have simply decorated their jars with the Zia Bird and floral elements.

AMM 100

The mother-of-pearl and rosewood sound hole and the mother-of-pearl fretboard inlay on the AMM 100 is inspired by the remarkable pottery of the Mimbres pueblo.

The Mimbres culture consisted of several hundred small villages in souther New Mexico, each with less than 200 inhabitants, existing between approximately A.D. 100 and A.D. 1150. Their valley supported a rich diversity of wildlife, and the people lead a peaceful existence, relying on gathering, hunting, and some limited farming.

The Mimbreños began making pottery circa A.D. 200. Done primarily in black on a more-or-less white ground, the Mimbres images are noteworthy for their spontaneity and individuality. No other group of Southwestern peoples decorated ceramic vessels in a similar manner. While many Mimbres bowls feature geometric patterns—the common regional mode of embellishment—the figurative and narrative imagery is unique to the peoples of the Mimbres Valley. The bowls have largely been discovered in subfloor burials, customarily only one to a burial, where they were placed over the face of the deceased. Many are pierced, or “killed,” and the significance of such kill-holes is unclear. Explanations for them range from rendering the bowls functionally useless to allowing their spirit, or that of the deceased, to escape.

The soundhole of the AMM 100 faithfully mirrors the lip of the Mimbres bowl below.

In Mimbres culture the moon was considered to be a rabbit which was regularly devoured by an eagle,with the degree of consumption changing according to lunar phase. Rabbits (actually hares) were an integral part of Mimbres life used for food and skins and were frequently celebrated in their pottery. The inspiration for the Marker at the top of the AMM 100 fretboard was inspired by the image on this bowl which pairs the rabbit with a crescent moon.

So much pottery was found in burial pits and the quality of these pieces is so high that many believe it was created solely for mortuary use and that the image on the bowl has some specific ceremonial meaning. Below are some actual pictures and graphic images found on these extraordinary vessels.

Mimbres person


Mimbres Armadillo


Mimbres Fish Men


Mimbres Bat


Mimbres Birth


Mimbres paired Bees

whirlwind


rectangles and curves


Man Crane


Fish Monster


Skeleton with Rat


Shaman


Crane Swallowing Fish

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In expanding our Americana Series, we looked to Southwest Pueblo Native cultures. The mother-of-pearl and rosewood sound hole and the mother-of-pearl fretboard inlay on the AMM 100 is inspired by the remarkable pottery of the Mimbres pueblo.

The Mimbres culture consisted of several hundred small villages in souther New Mexico, each with less than 200 inhabitants, existing between approximately A.D. 100 and A.D. 1150. Their valley supported a rich diversity of wildlife, and the people lead a peaceful existence, relying on gathering, hunting, and some limited farming.

The Mimbreños began making pottery circa A.D. 200. Done primarily in black on a more-or-less white ground, the Mimbres images are noteworthy for their spontaneity and individuality. No other group of Southwestern peoples decorated ceramic vessels in a similar manner. While many Mimbres bowls feature geometric patterns—the common regional mode of embellishment—the figurative and narrative imagery is unique to the peoples of the Mimbres Valley. The bowls have largely been discovered in subfloor burials, customarily only one to a burial, where they were placed over the face of the deceased. Many are pierced, or “killed,” and the significance of such kill-holes is unclear. Explanations for them range from rendering the bowls functionally useless to allowing their spirit, or that of the deceased, to escape.

The soundhole of the AMM 100 faithfully mirrors the lip of the Mimbres bowl below.

In Mimbres culture the moon was considered to be a rabbit which was regularly devoured by an eagle,with the degree of consumption changing according to lunar phase. Rabbits (actually hares) were an integral part of Mimbres life used for food and skins and were frequently celebrated in their pottery. The inspiration for the Marker at the top of the AMM 100 fretboard was inspired by the image on this bowl which pairs the rabbit with a crescent moon.

So much pottery was found in burial pits and the quality of these pieces is so high that many believe it was created solely for mortuary use and that the image on the bowl has some specific ceremonial meaning. Below are some actual pictures and graphic images found on these extraordinary vessels.

Mimbres person


Mimbres Armadillo


Mimbres Fish Men


Mimbres Bat


Mimbres Birth


Mimbres paired Bees

whirlwind


rectangles and curves


Man Crane


Fish Monster


Skeleton with Rat


Shaman


Crane Swallowing Fish

Read Full Post »